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Home / International News / Press Releases / 2007 / March / March 28, 2007
Hot New Plants -- Flowering & Shade Trees For 2007

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Hot New Plants -- Flowering & Shade Trees For 2007

As a lifelong Horticultural professional, Vicki Smith (www.LGYP.com) has news about hot new flowering and shade trees for 2007 and guidance for growing these trees in the home garden. With so much focus on outdoor living and container gardening, these new ornamental trees will bring excitement to the landscape, patio, deck or in raised planters mixed with annuals, perennials, ornamental grasses, shrubs or even tropicals.

Woodbine, MD (PRWeb) March 28, 2007 -- As a lifelong Horticultural professional, Vicki Smith (www.LGYP.com) has news about hot new flowering and shade trees for 2007 and guidance for growing these trees in the home garden. With so much focus on outdoor living and container gardening, these new ornamental trees will bring excitement to the landscape, patio, deck or in raised planters mixed with annuals, perennials, ornamental grasses, shrubs or even tropicals.

Several interesting new trees offer ornamental characteristics throughout the gardening season. Gaining popularity for its striking chartreuse new growth, lemon yellow summer color and changing yellow, orange and scarlet autumn foliage is Tiger Eyes® Cutleaf Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina 'Baitiger'). Unlike most cutleaf or laceleaf Japanese Maples that are grafted to a certain height, the 'Ryusen' Japanese Maple grows more like a vining plant. It can be grown quite low to the ground, be staked to any height the gardener wants the tree to cascade from, or grown on a structure like an arbor, trellis or fence. 'Ryusen' has bright spring and summer leaves that change to oranges, reds and yellows for multi-season interest.

Formerly thought of as a variation of the Kousa Dogwood, the Chinese Evergreen Dogwood (Cornus angustata) has been elevated to its own species. A new selection, the 'Empress of China™', is more vigorous, out performing other dogwood species with the volume of blooms, increased length of bloom time and overall beauty of the tree with its multi-season characteristics. The bloom time of six to seven weeks can be twice that of the Flowering Dogwood (Cornus florida). The heavy fruit set of the strawberry-like berries provides interest through fall. In Zones 7b and south, where evergreen, the leaves turn purple-red-green in winter. More drought resistant and heat tolerant than Cornus florida too.

Another tree that adds to the landscape nicely with its late spring and early summer flowering is the Southern or Evergreen Magnolia (M. grandiflora). Two recent introductions offer nice differences over the species. 'Brackens Brown Beauty' is one of the best selections offered because of its more compact and dense form and neater habit since it doesn't drop as many leaves as others. 'Miss Chloe®' has quite large flowers at 10 to 12 inches as well as a dense, full canopy with well-spaced limbs for a nice, balanced appearance.

Considered garden staples in the south, new breeding work with Crapemyrtles (Lagerstroemia) is yielding hardier varieties for use in the middle latitudes of the states. The new 'Pink Velour' has large coral pink blooms as much as 12 inches in length in the summer. If the blooms are trimmed after the flowering burst is passed, new blooms will continue to form until nearly the first frost.

Two shade trees of note provide much-needed summer shade, but also have nice fall color and graceful overall form and texture. Finer in texture than other oaks, the Willow Oak or Quercus phellos grows in a wide range of conditions ranging from wet and moist areas to dry areas. The 'Hightower' cultivar is a fast growing tree that is more tolerant of higher pH soils than Q. phellos seedlings in particular and many other oaks in general, especially the popular Pin Oak (Q. palustris), Sawtooth Oak (Q. accutissima) and Red Oak (Q. rubra). The American Elm or Ulmus Americana didn't disappear from the landscape when Dutch Elm Disease was introduced accidentally. But trees have needed maintenance programs to remain healthy. The key is to select disease resistant varieties. 'Princeton' has the naturally uniform vase shape that allows the tree to grow up and over a street; the reason the trees were planted by the millions. With a vigorous growth rate and pretty yellow fall color, 'Princeton's resistance to elm leaf beetles and Dutch elm disease make it a good choice.

An evergreen that deserves increased attention is the Spartan Juniper. Also known as Chinese Juniper 'Spartan' and Juniperus chinensis 'Spartan', it is hardy in Zones 4a through 10a, making it able to be planted in almost all of the United States. With this level of heat and cold tolerance, it is also nice to know that salt tolerance is also quite high allowing seaside and roadside plantings. Once established drought tolerance allows it to be used in broader areas. Topping out at 15 to 20 feet, but with rapid, columnar growth, this large shrub, or small tree can be effectively used as a screen or for a hedge as well as for groupings or accents since they are low maintenance.

One of the newest, most interesting trees to come on the market isn't new at all. The Wollemi Pine or Wollemia nobilis goes back in the fossil record and was thought to be extinct over 65 million years ago. Recently discovered plants growing in a remote region in Australia have lead to the re-introduction and conservation efforts. The Wollemi Pine is related to the Norfolk Island Pine that many people think of as an interior or houseplant, hardy only to Zones 9 and 10 and to the Monkey Puzzle Tree, hardy only in Zones 7 - 10 in certain areas. To my eye, the Wollemi Pine looks very much like the Norfolk Island Pine but is hardy through Zone 6a. Trials are underway to determine the northern most hardiness and it may turn out that the trees can grow in Zone 5b. Even if they are only hardy through Zone 6a, this makes this new, exciting tree hardy in Coastal areas of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Long Island and New York, central Pennsylvania, southern Ohio through southern Missouri and Kansas and most of Southwest including New Mexico, Arizona, California and Nevada and much of the Pacific Northwest including Oregon, Washington and Idaho. The Wollemi Pines will be available at selected independent garden centers throughout the country for Spring 2007.

With new, dramatic, easy to grow trees that add color and shade to the garden for months on end, it can be very satisfying to enjoy spring's new energy and reap the results of just a small amount of effort. Trees are one of the best landscaping investments a homeowner can make since they add to the property value, save energy with their shade and help make a house a home. These exciting new plants and local sources for them can be found at www.HotNewPlants.com.

Press Contact: STEVE CISSEL
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Press Release Source: EMediaWire


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