Lying really does create desire
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Twitter ~ Facebook
Home / Technology News / 2010 / September 2010 / September 30, 2010
Lying really does create desire to clean 'dirty' body part
RSS / Print / Comments

University of Michigan

Husbands better at resolving marital conflicts: Study

Lying really does create desire to clean 'dirty' body part

How you fight with your spouse can predict the fate of your marriage

More on University of Michigan

Technology News

Study to find whether leptin helps type 1 diabetic patients
To determine whether adding the hormone leptin to standard insulin therapy might help rein in the tumultuous blood-sugar levels of people with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, a clinical trial at UT Southwestern Medical Center is being carried out. ANI

Why deaf have 'super vision'
Researchers have found reasons for the enhanced abilities in the remaining senses of deaf people. ANI

Tsunami risk higher than expected in LA, other major cities
A new study has revealed that the risk of destructive tsunamis is in places such as Kingston, Istanbul, and Los Angeles. ANI

Lying really does create desire to clean 'dirty' body part

Remember when your mom asked you to wash your mouth after you talked dirty? Well, it seems she had it right. A University of Michigan study has found that lying really does create a desire to clean the dirty body part.


Washington, Sept 30 : Remember when your mom asked you to wash your mouth after you talked dirty? Well, it seems she had it right. A University of Michigan study has found that lying really does create a desire to clean the 'dirty' body part.

"The references to 'dirty hands' or 'dirty mouths' in everyday language suggest that people think about abstract issues of moral purity in terms of more concrete experiences with physical purity," said Spike W.S. Lee.

The team found that participants, who lied on the phone, leaving an untrue and malevolent voicemail, felt a stronger desire for mouthwash and were willing to pay more for it than those who lied on e-mail.

And conversely, those who lied on e-mail, typing the same mean message, felt a stronger desire for hand sanitizer and were willing to pay more for that.

Saying nice and ethical things, on the other hand, made it less appealing to clean the body part involved in conveying the message.

Verbal lying increased participants' assessment of mouthwash while lying on e-mail, using their hands, increased the assessment of hand sanitizer's value.

"This study shows how 'concrete' the metaphorical links are between abstract and concrete domains of life," Norbert Schwarz, a psychologist at the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR), said.

"Not only do people want to clean after a dirty deed, they want to clean the specific body part involved."

The findings of the study, published in the current (October) issue of Psychological Science, support that connection.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us