True midlife crisis begins
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'True midlife crisis 'begins in 30s' for overworked Brits: Survey
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'True midlife crisis 'begins in 30s' for overworked Brits: Survey

People in their 30s are not that worried about a receding hairline than work and relationship pressures, which actually is the start of their unhappiest decade-the true midlife crisis, revealed a Brit survey.


London, Sep 29 : People in their 30s are not that worried about a receding hairline than work and relationship pressures, which actually is the start of their unhappiest decade-the "true midlife crisis", revealed a Brit survey.

Of those questioned, more people aged 35 to 44 said that they felt lonely or depressed than in other age groups.

The survey also suggested that busy parents were using Facebook and similar sites to stay in touch with children.

Relationship advice charity Relate, which is behind the research, said it revealed a "true midlife crisis".

Of those surveyed, 21 percent of men and women aged 35 to 44 said they felt lonely a lot of the time, and a similar percentage said that bad relationships, either at work or home, had left them feeling depressed.

The same proportion said they felt closer to friends than family, and a quarter said they wished they had more time for their family.

"Traditionally we associated the midlife crisis with people in their late 40s to 50s, but the report reveals that this period could be reaching people earlier than we would expect," the BBC quoted Claire Tyler, Relate's chief executive, as saying.It's no coincidence that we see people in this age group in the biggest numbers at Relate," he added.

The survey, conducted in collaboration with phone and broadband firm Talk Talk, revealed that 28 percent of 35 to 44-year-olds questioned said they had left a job because of a bad-working relationship with a colleague.

It also shed light on how family relationships are standing up to modern life.

While most people described their relationship with their partner as in positive terms, one in five were worried about the current financial climate.

Working long hours, arguments, proper division of household chores and poor sex were cited equally by men and women as the most common sources of problems.

ANI

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