Water based artificial leaves
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Twitter ~ Facebook
Home / Technology News / 2010 / September 2010 / September 25, 2010
Water-gel-based 'artificial leaves' that produce electricity
RSS / Print / Comments

North Carolina State University

New study lays foundation for building on the Moon

Brainstorming rules 'can lead to success in real-world business settings'

Water-gel-based 'artificial leaves' that produce electricity

More on North Carolina State University

Solar / Photovoltaic Industry

New discovery paves way for pollution-free electricity production

Huge parts of world drying up due to land 'evapotranspiration': Study

Masdar City Master Plan Review Provides Progress Update

More on North Carolina State University

Technology News

Study to find whether leptin helps type 1 diabetic patients
To determine whether adding the hormone leptin to standard insulin therapy might help rein in the tumultuous blood-sugar levels of people with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, a clinical trial at UT Southwestern Medical Center is being carried out. ANI

Why deaf have 'super vision'
Researchers have found reasons for the enhanced abilities in the remaining senses of deaf people. ANI

Tsunami risk higher than expected in LA, other major cities
A new study has revealed that the risk of destructive tsunamis is in places such as Kingston, Istanbul, and Los Angeles. ANI

Water-gel-based 'artificial leaves' that produce electricity

North Carolina State University researchers have shown that water-gel-based artificial leaves can act like solar cells to produce electricity.


Washington, Sept 25 : North Carolina State University researchers have shown that water-gel-based "artificial leaves" can act like solar cells to produce electricity.

They also have the potential to be less expensive and more environmentally friendly than the current silicon-based solar cells.

The researchers used plant chlorophyll in one of the experiments - coupled with electrodes coated by carbon materials, such as carbon nanotubes or graphite.

The light-sensitive molecules get "excited" by the sun's rays to produce electricity, similar to plant molecules that get excited to synthesize sugars in order to grow, said NC State's Dr. Orlin Velev.

Now that they've proven the concept, Velev says the researchers will work to fine-tune the water-based photovoltaic devices, making them even more like real leaves.

"The other challenge is to change the water-based gel and light-sensitive molecules to improve the efficiency of the solar cells," Velev said.

"We believe that the concept of biologically inspired 'soft' devices for generating electricity may in the future provide an alternative for the present-day solid-state technologies."

The study has been published online in the Journal of Materials Chemistry.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2018 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us