Experimental vaccine against Alzheimer
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Experimental vaccine against Alzheimer's disease created
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Experimental vaccine against Alzheimer's disease created

Researchers have successfully created an experimental vaccine against the small protein that forms plaques in the brain and is believed to contribute to the development of Alzheimers disease.


Washington, Oct 9 : Researchers have successfully created an experimental vaccine against the small protein that forms plaques in the brain and is believed to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease.

Compared with similar so-called DNA vaccines that the UT Southwestern researchers tested in an animal study, new study states experimental vaccine stimulated more than 10 times as many antibodies that bind to and eliminate beta-amyloid.

"The antibody is specific; it binds to plaque in the brain. It doesn't bind to brain tissue that does not contain plaque. This approach shows promise in generating enough antibodies to be useful clinically in treating patients," said Roger Rosenberg, senior author of the study.

The next step in the research is to test long-term safety in animals, Dr. Rosenberg said.

"After seven years developing this vaccine, we are hopeful it will not show any significant toxicity, and that we will be able to develop it for human use," he added.

The results appeared in the journal Vaccine.

ANI

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