stem cells shape
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Twitter ~ Facebook
Home / Technology News / 2010 / October 2010 / October 8, 2010
How stem cells shape up to their surroundings
RSS / Print / Comments

Columbia University

How stem cells shape up to their surroundings

Loss of cell powerhouses linked to Parkinson's

Loss of cell powerhouses linked to Parkinson's

More on Columbia University

University of Southampton

Now, ears too can be used for airport security ID checks

How stem cells shape up to their surroundings

'Ear on the universe' to revolutionize astronomy studies

More on University of Southampton

Technology News

Study to find whether leptin helps type 1 diabetic patients
To determine whether adding the hormone leptin to standard insulin therapy might help rein in the tumultuous blood-sugar levels of people with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, a clinical trial at UT Southwestern Medical Center is being carried out. ANI

Why deaf have 'super vision'
Researchers have found reasons for the enhanced abilities in the remaining senses of deaf people. ANI

Tsunami risk higher than expected in LA, other major cities
A new study has revealed that the risk of destructive tsunamis is in places such as Kingston, Istanbul, and Los Angeles. ANI

How stem cells shape up to their surroundings

Engineering the topography on which stem cells grow, and the mechanical forces working on them, can act as a powerful agent for change as their chemical environment, found a new study.


Washington, Oct 8 : Engineering the topography on which stem cells grow, and the mechanical forces working on them, can act as a powerful agent for change as their chemical environment, found a new study.

Stem cells respond to the stiffness, chemistry and topography of the environments they find themselves in - and scientists building their understanding of the complex signalling controlling these responses hope to harness this knowledge to take stem cell research further.

Other than increasing the potential to guide stem cells to create desired materials for research and clinical applications, using nanoscale topographies could eliminate (or alternatively enhance) steps including those involving feeder layers and synthetic induction supplements currently used in stem cell culture.

In addition, tomorrow's increasingly sophisticated prosthetics for regenerative medicine could feature surfaces with varied tissue zones for different purposes, thanks to this improved understanding.

In the study, Laura McNamara of the University of Glasgow, UK, Centre for Cell Engineering, together with colleagues from Columbia University, New York, Nanotechnology Centre for Mechanics in Regenerative Medicine and the Bone and Joint Research Group at the University of Southampton, UK, review the latest developments in the use of nanotopography to direct stem cell differentiation.

In particular they look at skeletal (mesenchymal) stem cells.

Evidence is mounting that researchers can both maintain stem cells in the undifferentiated state, and determine the direction of their fate, by precise control of the surface features beneath them.

Stem cells have an uncanny ability to detect and respond to nanoscale grooves, pits and ridges, and are particularly sensitive to the spacing and regularity of these features.

Nanotopographical responsiveness has been observed in diverse cell types including fibroblasts, osteoblasts, osteoclasts, endothelial, smooth muscle, epithelial, and epitenon cells.

"This is intriguing from a biomaterials perspective, as it demonstrates that surface features of just a few nanometres can influence how cells will respond to, and form tissue on, materials," said McNamara.

In particular, the authors envisage applications involving engineered topography components for stem cells in regenerative medicine, for instance, in orthopaedics and dental implants.

A combination of different topographies could be used to differentially functionalise implants for distinct applications, or demarcate particular "zones" within a single device.

Orthopaedic implants designed with specific regions tailored to integrate with bone and improve the chances of implant fixation might be seamlessly join other areas of the implant programmed to reduce excessive bony ingrowth, for example.

Some surfaces with clinical potential include nanostructured titanium and diamond. A growing number of precision nanofabrication techniques are becoming available to help carve out the substrates needed for this research.

Skeletal stem cells have even been shown to grow into non-skeletal cells (known as transdifferentiation) on surfaces with the right groves and ridges - in some studies this has produced neural tissue.

"With the emergence of mechanical stimuli as critical modulators of cellular functionality, nanotopography should prove an excellent tool for development of novel biomaterials capable of promoting desirable cellular behaviour, discouraging unwanted cell responses, and preventing or ameliorating pathological changes," suggest the authors.

The study has been published in the Journal of Tissue Engineering.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us