Stress heavy combat
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Twitter ~ Facebook
Home / Technology News / 2010 / October 2010 / October 7, 2010
Stress of heavy combat can be life-long: Study
RSS / Print / Comments

Harvard Medical School

Loss of cell powerhouses linked to Parkinson's

Loss of cell powerhouses linked to Parkinson's

Stress of heavy combat can be life-long: Study

More on Harvard Medical School

University of Florida

55-million-year-old fossil sheds light on bizarre extinct mammal

Staying slim makes it easier for women to climb the success ladder

Stress of heavy combat can be life-long: Study

More on University of Florida

Technology News

Squeezable cell phone to give you status info without having to look at it
Scientists have developed a squeezable cellphone - SqueezeBlock - using tiny motors built into the casing to mimic the behaviour of a spring. ANI

Airplanes that also travel in space to be 'the holy grail' of aeronautics
A British firm is working on an airplane that would also travel in space. ANI

Was Oz-Indian scientist first to discover recently found Earth-like planet?
The recent discovery of Earth-like planet caused a tizzy in the science world, but many are still sceptical of the claim. ANI

Stress of heavy combat can be life-long: Study

A new University of Florida study has found that the trauma from hard combat can devastate veterans until old age, even as it influences others to be wiser, gentler and more accepting in their twilight years.


Washington, Oct 7 : A new University of Florida study has found that the trauma from hard combat can devastate veterans until old age, even as it influences others to be wiser, gentler and more accepting in their twilight years.

The findings are ominous with the exposure of today's men and women to heavy combat in the ongoing Iraq and Afghanistan wars on terror at a rate that probably exceeds the length of time for U.S. veterans during World War II, said UF sociologist Monika Ardelt.

"The study shows that we really need to take care of our veterans when they arrive home, because if we don't, they may have problems for the rest of their lives," she said. "Yet veterans report they are facing long waiting lines at mental health clinics and struggling to get the services they need."

The 60-year study, co-authored with UF graduate student Scott Landes and George Vaillant, a psychiatry professor at Harvard Medical School, compared 50 World War II veterans with high combat exposure with 110 veterans without any combat experiences.

Results showed that heavy combat exposure at a young age had a detrimental effect on physical health and psychological well-being for about half of the men well into their 80s, she said.

Getting treatment not only prevents serious health problems but it can boost the mental well-being of veterans with heavy combat exposure to higher levels than their comrades who saw little battle action, Ardelt said.

The study found that about half of the veterans who experienced a high level of combat showed signs of stress-related growth at mid-life, leading to greater wisdom and well-being in old age than among veterans who witnessed no combat, she said.

"You can either conclude that God has abandoned you, the world is an unfair place and there is nothing else to do but close yourself off from it all or you can manage to open yourself up and develop compa*sion for the suffering of others realizing that you have now become a part of it," she said.

The findings were published in the latest issue of the journal Research in Human Development.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us