gene study paves
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Twitter ~ Facebook
Home / Technology News / 2010 / October 2010 / October 11, 2010
New gene study paves way for more anti-malaria treatments
RSS / Print / Comments

University of Edinburgh

New gene study paves way for more anti-malaria treatments

Pomegranate juice reduces 'spare tyre in men, muffin top in women'

Scots to use space age technology to keep injury at bay during Delhi CWG

More on University of Edinburgh

Malaria

New gene study paves way for more anti-malaria treatments

Seven Secure Oslo Business for Peace Awards for 2010

Fans accuse Cheryl Cole of choosing two worst singers for 'X Factor' finals

More on Malaria

Technology News

Study to find whether leptin helps type 1 diabetic patients
To determine whether adding the hormone leptin to standard insulin therapy might help rein in the tumultuous blood-sugar levels of people with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes, a clinical trial at UT Southwestern Medical Center is being carried out. ANI

Why deaf have 'super vision'
Researchers have found reasons for the enhanced abilities in the remaining senses of deaf people. ANI

Tsunami risk higher than expected in LA, other major cities
A new study has revealed that the risk of destructive tsunamis is in places such as Kingston, Istanbul, and Los Angeles. ANI

New gene study paves way for more anti-malaria treatments

Scientists have discovered genes that are capable of making some malaria-carrying mosquitoes resistant to insecticide.


London, Oct 11 : Scientists have discovered genes that are capable of making some malaria-carrying mosquitoes resistant to insecticide.

Scottish researchers have found a gene that enables the parasite that causes the infection to resist treatment with the plant-based remedy artemisinin.

They hope the breakthrough could boost efforts to prevent the disease.

In many countries where the parasite has developed resistance to previously effective common treatments such as chloroquine, artemisinin remains the only effective treatment against the infection.

However, malarial resistance to artemisinin appears to be developing, potentially creating problems in controlling malaria.

The study, by scientists from the University of Edinburgh and the New University of Lisbon, used emerging technology to scan the genetic fingerprint of drug resistant parasites that infect rodents.

"This knowledge from rodent malaria parasites opens up new directions that will allow this gene to be investigated in human malaria," the Scotsman quoted Paul Hunt of the University of Edinburgh as saying.

"This may help track the evolution of drug resistance and may eventually enable the design of alternative, effective drugs," he added.

The technology used by the scientists allows rapid identification of genes that enable the parasite to withstand existing drug treatments.

The study was published in BMC Genomics.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us