Stress increases memory loss risk
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Stress increases memory loss risk in diabetics
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Stress increases memory loss risk in diabetics

A new study from Edinburgh University suggests that stress increases the risk of memory loss in diabetics.


London, Feb 22 : A new study from Edinburgh University suggests that stress increases the risk of memory loss in diabetics.

The findings showed that high levels of a stress hormone called cortisol slowed down the brain function of people suffering from diabetes.

According to the researchers, the breakthrough could offer hope for new treatments for the problem.

For the study, the authors looked at more than 1,066 men and women aged between 60 and 75 who all suffered from type-2 diabetes, the most common form of the condition in adults, which has been linked to lifestyle factors such as Obesity.

"We know that type 2 diabetes is linked to problems with memory, but the reason behind this is unclear," the Telegraph quoted study's lead author Dr Rebecca Reynolds as saing.

"This study shows that older people with diabetes who have higher levels of stress hormones in their blood are more likely to have experienced cognitive decline.

"It may be that by regulating cortisol levels, we could help improve cognitive decline in patients with type 2 diabetes," Reynolds added.

The findings are published in the journal Diabetes Care.

ANI

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