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Oslo blast suspect planned attack out of fear of Islam


July 24, 2011 - Oslo (Norway)

The Norwegian man charged Saturday with a pair of attacks in Oslo that killed at least 92 people, has left behind a detailed manifesto calling for a Christian war to defend Europe against the threat of Muslim domination.

Norwegian and American officials familiar with the investigation said the suspect, Anders Behring Breivik, 32,was a right-wing fundamentalist Christian and a gun-loving Norwegian obsessed with what he saw as the threats of multiculturalism and Muslim immigration.

"We are not sure whether he was alone or had help. What we know is that he is right wing and a Christian fundamentalist," The New York Times quoted police official Roger Andresen, as saying in a televised news conference.

In the 1,500-page manifesto, posted on the Web hours before the attacks, Breivik recorded a day-by-day diary of months of planning for the attacks, and claimed to be part of a small group that intend to "seize political and military control of Western European countries and implement a cultural conservative political agenda."

He predicted a conflagration that would kill or injure more than a million people, adding, "The time for dialogue is over. We gave peace a chance. The time for armed resistance has come."

The manifesto was signed Andrew Berwick, an Anglicized version of his name.

A former American government official briefed on the case said investigators believed the manifesto was Breivik's work.

The manifesto, entitled "2083: A European Declaration of Independence," equates liberalism and multiculturalism with "cultural Marxism," which the document says is destroying European Christian civilization.

The document also describes a secret meeting in London in April 2002 to reconstitute the Knights Templar, a Crusader military order. It says nine representatives of eight European countries, evidently including Mr. Breivik, with an additional three members unable to attend, attended the meeting, including a "European-American."

The document does not name the attendees or say whether they were aware of Breivik's planned attacks, though investigators presumably will now try to determine if the people exist and what their connection is to Breivik.

Thomas Hegghammer, a terrorism specialist at the Norwegian Defense Research Establishment, said the manifesto bears an eerie resemblance to those of Osama bin Laden and other Al Qaeda leaders, though from a Christian rather than a Muslim point of view.

"It seems to be an attempt to mirror Al Qaeda, exactly in reverse," Hegghammer said.

Breivik was also believed to have posted a video on Friday summarizing his arguments. In its closing moments, the video depicts Breivik in military uniform, holding assault weapons.

Rarely has a mass murder suspect left so detailed an account of his activities that includes details of chemicals purchased, his sometimes ham-handed experiments making explosives and his first successful test detonation of a bomb in a remote location on June 13. He intersperses the account of bomb making with details of his television watching, including the Eurovision music contest and the American police drama "The Shield."

The manifesto ends with a chilling signoff: "I believe this will be my last entry. It is now Fri July 22nd, 12.51."

ANI

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