Malaria funding falling short across
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Home / International News / 2010 / October 2010 / October 2, 2010
Malaria funding 'falling short' across the world, claims report
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Malaria funding 'falling short' across the world, claims report

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Malaria funding 'falling short' across the world, claims report

There is a 60 percent global shortfall in funds for malaria control, according to a report by the UK and African experts.


London, Oct 2 : There is a 60 percent global shortfall in funds for malaria control, according to a report by the UK and African experts.

Researchers have reportedly found that only 21 out of 93 countries, where malaria is common, have received enough money to implement effective control measures.

According to the BBC, experts have claimed in the Lancet medical journal that African countries have received the biggest funding, but billions are still needed elsewhere.

The researchers, led by Professor Bob Snow of Oxford University and Kenya's Kenyatta National Hospital, found that annual international funding had increased by 166 percent from 730 million dollars to 1.94 billion dollars since 2007.

"Any decline in malaria-funding commitments will run the risk of a resurgence of malaria in countries that have enjoyed the benefits of this funding to provide protection from malaria since 2002," the report claimed.

Poor countries with inadequate donor assistance and large sectors of their population at risk of malaria must remain the focus of attention. Sustained funding in these countries is crucial or 9.9 billion dollars invested since 2002 will have been in vain," it added.

The research found that among 21 countries, 12 of them in Africa, have received adequate funds to combat malaria. However, 50 countries, including Niger and Sierra Leone have not received enough money from the international community in this regard.

"The challenge will now be on finding more money, making sure funding is linked to performance and putting pressure on malaria-endemic countries with large domestic incomes to do more for themselves," Professor Snow insisted.

ANI

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