playing double game
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Commonwealth Games ~ Nobel Prizes ~ Kim Jong-il ~ Hamid Karzai ~ Ed Miliband ~ Tony Abbott ~ Kathleen Sebelius ~ US Elections ~ Other International News
Home / International News / 2010 / October 2010 / October 15, 2010
Pak playing 'double game' in Afghanistan to retain influence post US pull out: Expert
RSS / Print / Comments

Taliban

Pak playing 'double game' in Afghanistan to retain influence post US pull out: Expert

US in favour of cross-border attacks to check Taliban flow from Pak

Musharraf calls PML-N leaders toothless 'paper lions' following chargesheet against him

More on Taliban

Top News

144 Section in Hyderabad ahead of Ayodhya verdict

All India Bar Examination mandatory for law graduates to practice in India

It's desirable that China frees Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu:Japanese PM

Craven's horror flicks 'were inspired by real stories'

RBI will intervene if inflows turn lumpy: Subbarao

Enforcement Directorate issues 'Look Out Circular' against Lalit Modi

Now, laser technology that destroys tumours using heat

Waist size, not BMI can foretell cardiovascular risk in children

Pak playing 'double game' in Afghanistan to retain influence post US pull out: Expert

Pakistan is playing its double game in Afghanistan to protect its strategic interests in the region once the United States pulls out of the country, an analyst has said.


Washington, Oct 15: Pakistan is playing its 'double game' in Afghanistan to protect its strategic interests in the region once the United States pulls out of the country, an analyst has said.

Retired General Talat Masood, now a security analyst, said that it is the reason behind Pakistan's support to Taliban's three main Afghan factions - the Quetta Shura, the Haqqani network, and the forces of Gulbuddin Hekmatyar.

"The legacy of the Soviet era is still being lived by Pakistan. America has abandoned Pakistan [before] - they may leave behind a Pakistan that is unstable," the Christian Science Monitor quoted Masood, as saying.

He also said that the Pakistan provides sanctuary to pro-Pakistan militant groups to give itself leverage in any post-pullout scenario similar to America's abandonment of the region after the Soviet withdrawal.

"So that's why it's very important for America not to push Pakistan to a position where [Pakistan has] to antagonize every segment of the Pashtuns, including the Haqqani group, which may turn inward, toward Pakistan," he added.

Masood further said that Pakistan would ultimately work with the US to work on the Afghanistan government-Taliban negotiations to end the nine-year war.

"Ultimately, Pakistan will have to establish its own writ, but it's a question of when it's more appropriate," he said.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us