Even passengers phone calls
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Commonwealth Games ~ Nobel Prizes ~ Kim Jong-il ~ Hamid Karzai ~ Ed Miliband ~ Tony Abbott ~ Kathleen Sebelius ~ US Elections ~ Other International News
Home / International News / 2010 / October 2010 / October 13, 2010
Even passengers' phone calls are a danger to drivers
RSS / Print / Comments

Daily Mail

Now, 'Zork' your bubbly to keep the fizz from going flat

Why some people always have a runny nose while others don't

Even passengers' phone calls are a danger to drivers

More on Daily Mail

Cornell University

Even passengers' phone calls are a danger to drivers

Saturn's rings formed by destruction of Titan-sized moon

In 10 years: Affordable robots to complete daunting home-tasks

More on Cornell University

Top News

144 Section in Hyderabad ahead of Ayodhya verdict

Karnataka BJP issues whip for Yeddyurappa's trust vote

Now, 'Zork' your bubbly to keep the fizz from going flat

Christina Aguilera splits from husband Jordan Bratman

Google Inc. working with less known handset makers to target middle clas Indians

Indian boxers to fight for gold on Day 10 of CWG

Females as good as males in math skills: Study

Blame your mom for your muffin top or thunder thighs

Even passengers' phone calls are a danger to drivers

A study on the dangers of talking on a mobile while driving has found that even a passengers phone call is enough to distract the driver.


London, Oct 13 : A study on the dangers of talking on a mobile while driving has found that even a passenger's phone call is enough to distract the driver.

Researchers say that hearing one side of a phone conversation can affect concentration more than being part of it, as a 'halfalogue' is up to three times as big a drain on the brain as a dialogue or monologue.

The American researchers set a group of students computerised tests that simulated the levels of concentration needed to keep in a lane when driving or react to traffic lights.

As they did the tests, they listened to recordings of complete mobile phone conversations, one-person summaries of the conversations or just one side of the call. Others did the tests in silence.

According to the journal Psychological Science, those who listened to the 'halfalogues' did significantly worse.

The reason for it is believed to be that as well as trying to fill in the gaps in the conversation the brain is flummoxed by the unpredictability of the gaps and pauses.

"Overhearing someone on a cell phone means only hearing half of an ongoing conversation - a 'halfalogue'," the Daily Mail quoted Lauren Emberson, of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, as saying.

The researcher, a psychology PhD candidate, came up with the idea for the study while becoming irritated during a journey on a bus as an undergraduate.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us