Indo  talks   Creek
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
2010 Commonwealth Games ~ 2010 Nobel Prizes ~ Sachin Tendulkar ~ Rajasthan Royals ~ Kings XI Punjab ~ Sushil Kumar ~ Deepika Kumari ~ Somdev Devvarman ~ HR Bhardwaj
Home / India News / 2007 / May 2007 / May 18, 2007
Indo-Pak talks on Sir Creek conclude on positive note
RSS / Print / Comments

Top News

144 Section in Hyderabad ahead of Ayodhya verdict

Manmohan Singh to campaign in Bihar today

FBI failed to act on Headley's wife's terror link expose 3 yrs before Mumbai attacks

Craven's horror flicks 'were inspired by real stories'

RBI will intervene if inflows turn lumpy: Subbarao

Enforcement Directorate issues 'Look Out Circular' against Lalit Modi

Now, laser technology that destroys tumours using heat

Waist size, not BMI can foretell cardiovascular risk in children

Indo-Pak talks on Sir Creek conclude on positive note

India and Pakistan moved a step ahead of the resolution of the Sir Creek estuary dispute, with both sides concluding the 10th round of the bilateral talks on a positive note in Rawalpindi today and agreeing to meet again.

Rawalpindi/New Delhi, May 18 : India and Pakistan moved a step ahead of the resolution of the Sir Creek estuary dispute, with both sides concluding the 10th round of the bilateral talks on a positive note in Rawalpindi today and agreeing to meet again.

The highlight of this round of the talks was the exchange of the maps and charts showing both countries' respective positions on the delineation of the boundary in the estuary and the delimitation of the maritime boundary.

"The two sides discussed the delimitation of the maritime boundary as well as the delineation of the boundary in the Sir Creek in the light of the results of the joint survey," a release from the Indian government stated.

Now, both the sides are expected to study the maps and discuss their viewpoints on each other's claims and then convey the outcome to their respective governments.

A statement issued by the India Foreign Ministry said talks between Surveyor General of India, Major General M. Gopal Rao and Pakistan's Rear Admiral and Additional Secretary, Ministry of Defence, Tanveer Faiz, were held in "cordial and friendly atmosphere"

Both Islamabad and New Delhi pledged to hold more meetings to resolve the dispute over the 96-km estuary in the Rann of Kutch separating Gujarat from Sindh in Pakistan.

This was the first formal round of talks on Sir Creek under the fourth round of composite dialogue after the two countries conducted a joint survey and agreed on a common map of the marshlands that will help demarcate maritime boundary between them.

Rao, who lead an eight-member Indian delegation, also met Pakistan's Defence Secretary Kamran Rasool.

In January, the hydrographers from the two countries conducted a 20-day-long joint survey of the estuary.

The dispute lies in the interpretation of the boundary line between Kutch and Sindh as depicted in a 1914 and 1925 map. Pakistan lays claim to the entire creek as per paragraphs 9 and 10 of the Bombay Government Resolution of 1914 signed between then the Government of Sindh and Rao Maharaj of Kutch.

According to the United Nations Convention on Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), the deepest point in the marshy land is to be taken as the centre point, for demarcating the boundary on both sides, which would also prevent the inadvertent crossing over of fishermen of both nations into each other's territories.

The bone of contention has been agreeing on a common mid-point, which is feared by both sides on the grounds of losing out of land. One of the options both sides are likely to deliberate upon is the taking the mid-point of the Sir Creek channel running across the marshy area.

The boundary line, known as the "Green Line", is disputed by India, which maintains that it is an "indicative line", known as a "ribbon line" in technical jargon. India sticks to its position that the boundary lies mid-channel as depicted in another map drawn in 1925, and implemented by the installation of mid-channel pillars back in 1924.

Going by the UNCLOS' Principle of Equidistance the delegations will deliberate on mapping a mid-line by taking several equidistance points, which will not deprive either of the nations of their 200 nautical miles (370 kilometres), to which the Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZs) extend up to. These EEzs, which can be determined only through maritime boundaries, can be subjected to commercial exploitation.

The treaty resulting from UNCLOS provides new universal legal controls for the management of marine natural resources and the control of pollution.

ANI

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us