cleared Indo
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
2010 Commonwealth Games ~ 2010 Nobel Prizes ~ Sachin Tendulkar ~ Rajasthan Royals ~ Kings XI Punjab ~ Sushil Kumar ~ Deepika Kumari ~ Somdev Devvarman ~ HR Bhardwaj
Home / India News / 2007 / May 2007 / May 15, 2007
If cleared, Indo-US civilian nuclear deal will be unprecedented
RSS / Print / Comments

Top News

144 Section in Hyderabad ahead of Ayodhya verdict

Manmohan Singh to campaign in Bihar today

FBI failed to act on Headley's wife's terror link expose 3 yrs before Mumbai attacks

Craven's horror flicks 'were inspired by real stories'

RBI will intervene if inflows turn lumpy: Subbarao

Enforcement Directorate issues 'Look Out Circular' against Lalit Modi

Now, laser technology that destroys tumours using heat

Waist size, not BMI can foretell cardiovascular risk in children

If cleared, Indo-US civilian nuclear deal will be unprecedented

With the US Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs, Nicholas Burns, scheduled to visit India later this month to fine tune the 123 Agreement, New Delhi is hopeful of an unprecedented nuclear deal with Washington.

By Naveen Kapoor

New Delhi, May 15 : With the US Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs, Nicholas Burns, scheduled to visit India later this month to fine tune the 123 Agreement, New Delhi is hopeful of an unprecedented nuclear deal with Washington.

Authoritative sources in the Ministry of External Affairs (MEA) has said if the deal gets through, it would be unprecedented in a sense that India would not have to give up its nuclear programme to get the deal sealed.

"If the deal is inked, we won't have to give up our nuclear programme because of our separation plan which has parted civilian and military reactors. We can put all the safeguards and norms on our civilian reactors and isolate the military ones," he said.

"Unlike Japan and Germany, India does not have to give up its entire nuclear programme to get the deal done with the United States," he added.

On the apprehensions reiterated by the US media on some provisions of Hyde act, which does not allow the nuclear deal with a non-signatory of NPT and a country that has conducted a nuclear test, sources said it would be the responsibility of the US to sort out their legal issues.

"We are only concerned with what it offers to us in the agreement. The push and pull will go on, we will try to insulate our fuel cycle and make sure that our voluntary moratorium on nuclear test is not transformed into any kind of binding," he said.

Nicholas Burn has already stated that there is no provision in the Hyde act that stops us to have this deal with India.

MEA is also optimistic that once the 123 Agreement is done, the IAEA agreement will be through without much hassle, as 90 percent of its laws are similar to the US laws, but the Herculean task will be getting a go ahead from the Nuclear Suppliers Group.

Sources added: "Every member country will seek its interests, while some members see it as the opening of a huge market, while others can be uninterested".

Referring to a letter written by the US senator Tom Lantos to Prime Minister Manmohan Singh on Iran, MEA sources said, "India will carry on its strategic relationship with Iran as it is a crucial for our energy needs and its access to the Central Asian countries".

Although the MEA is not giving the final date for the agreement to take place, but there is the sense of urgency in both the camps.

On December 18, 2006, US President George W Bush signed the US-India Atomic Energy Cooperation Act, 2006, giving the bilateral nuclear deal legal status.

Terming the Bill as a 'strategic' one, Bush had said that the cooperation would help in cementing ties between both countries.

Prime Minister Manmohan Singh and Bush had agreed on having a civilian nuclear cooperation on July 18, 2005 during the former's visit to Washington, as per which, India could obtain uranium fuel for its civilian nuclear energy plant.

This was followed by a Separation Plan in March 2006 when Bush came to India. In the Separation Plan, New Delhi had to separate its civilian nuclear plants from its military one.

ANI

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us