Water scarcity forces
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Home / India News / 2007 / May 2007 / May 12, 2007
Water scarcity forces people to drink dirty water in Rajasthan
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Water scarcity forces people to drink dirty water in Rajasthan

Villagers in Rajasthan say they have to trek miles everyday to get their share of water, as most of the water-bodies dry during the summer months.

By Lokendra Singh

Jamwa-Ramgarh (Rajasthan), May 12 : Villagers in Rajasthan say they have to trek miles everyday to get their share of water, as most of the water-bodies dry during the summer months.

In Jamwa-Ramgarh village, women and small children carry heavy containers and walk in the scorching sun to fill up their share of water from dirty small ponds.

"We have to drink water anyway. We cannot help if it is dirty. There is no help from the government also," said Bardi, an old woman who walks 10 kilometres everyday to fetch water.

"It has not rained here properly for so many years. So we have water scarcity, there's no water in the dam, our crops has also got spoilt. We have to walk miles to get drinking water," said Hari Narayan, another villager.

Most of India is faced with a severe heat wave, with Punjab and Rajasthan recording temperatures above 40 degrees Celsius till recently.

According to the World Watch Institute, India will face acute water shortage by 2020, as its availability will be reduced to a third from the current level of 6500 cubic meters of water per person per annum.

Summer monsoon, which accounts for 80 percent of the country's rainfall, is almost always erratic, with a few areas getting flooded, others experiencing severe drought.

Agriculture experts fear that this drought will have a severe impact on food production.

Weather office has said this year's monsoons are likely to be 95 percent of the long-term average, which analysts say would help stimulate Asia's fourth-largest economy.

The annual June-September monsoon is vital for the country's 885 billion dollars economy because it provides the main source of water for agriculture, which generates over a fifth of the country's Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

ANI

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