Depressed people with
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Breast Cancer ~ Swine Flu ~ Lung Cancer ~ Heart attack ~ Pregnancy ~ All Health Topics
Home / Health News / 2009 / June 2009 / June 16, 2009
Depressed people with memory problems at increased Alzheimers risk
RSS / Print / Comments

Memory loss

Low testosterone levels could lead to Alzheimer's

How iron overload 'speeds up' Alzheimer's

Low testosterone levels could lead to Alzheimer's

More on Memory loss

Alzheimer's Disease

A faster way to look for drugs that regenerate nerve cells

Paralysed patient becomes world's first to get stem cell therapy

Experimental vaccine against Alzheimer's disease created

More on Alzheimer's Disease

Health News

New study confirms smoking, cancer link (reissue)
Taking up smoking results in epigenetic changes associated with the development of cancer, UK scientists have reported. ANI

Blame your mom for your muffin top or thunder thighs
A new study by an international team of researchers, including Cambridge and Oxford experts, has revealed that our propensity to be apple or pear-shaped is at least partly in our genes. ANI

Chemicals in mother's blood linked to child's obesity
A team of scientists has revealed that babies whose mothers had relatively high levels of the chemical DDE in their blood were more likely to both grow rapidly during their first 6 months and to have a high body ma*s index (BMI) by 14 months. ANI

Depressed people with memory problems at increased Alzheimers risk

Depressed individuals with memory problems are more likely to develop Alzheimers disease compared to people who are not depressed, says a new study.


Washington, June 16 : Depressed individuals with memory problems are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease compared to people who are not depressed, says a new study.

The research has been published in the June 16, 2009, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. However, the research also shows that the popular Alzheimer's drug donepezil may delay the progression to Alzheimer's disease for depressed people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or memory problems.

MCI is described as the period in-between normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. A person with MCI experiences memory problems that are greater than expected with normal aging but does not show other symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, such as difficulties in completing everyday activities.

To reach the conclusion, researchers followed 756 people with MCI who were between the ages of 55 and 91 for three years. Of those, 208 were diagnosed with depression using a test that measures the severity and intensity of a person's depressive symptoms. For every one point increase on the test, a participant's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease went up by three percent.

"Our longer term findings add to the body of evidence that suggests depression is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease," said study author Po H. Lu, PsyD, assistant professor of neurology with the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA in Los Angeles.

"Since the drug donepezil has been shown to improve the behavioral symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, our study also tested whether the drug would delay the progression to Alzheimer's disease in people with memory problems," the expert added.

Participants were given either vitamin E, donepezil or a placebo pill. The study found that at 1.7 years, among depressed people with mild cognitive impairment, 11 percent of those taking donepezil developed Alzheimer's disease compared to 25 percent of those who took vitamin E or placebo. At 2.2 years, 14 percent of those taking donepezil developed Alzheimer's compared to 29 percent of those who took vitamin E or placebo. Donepezil had little effect in the group of people who were not depressed.

"If we can delay the progression of this disease for even two years, it could significantly improve the quality of life for many people dealing with memory loss," said Lu.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us