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New kit to help parents check kids drug abuse by testing just a lock of hair
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New kit to help parents check kids drug abuse by testing just a lock of hair

Parents would now be able to detect whether their kids are using drugs with just a lock of their hair.


London, July 9 : Parents would now be able to detect whether their kids are using drugs with just a lock of their hair.

The 40-pound testing kit can detect seven drugs, including cannabis, cocaine, Ecstasy, and heroin.

According to Biosciences, the American manufacturer, it can detect molecules that remain in the hair for up to 90 days, "equipping parents with a valuable new tool for combating substance abuse," reports Times Online.

The test is much more reliable than saliva and urine tests.

Moreover, shampoo, bleach or other external chemicals do not affect the results.

Users of the tests, available online, send off a sample for testing and then receive a report on the amount of each drug detected as well as the frequency of use.

However, Martin Barnes, chief executive of the charity Drugscope, said that he opposed drug testing within the family "which could create barriers, destroy trust and ultimately do more harm than good".

"Many parents are understandably anxious about drugs, but it is important to be informed, remain calm and keep communication open if they suspect a child is using them," the BBC quoted him as saying.

"Parents need to build up a degree of trust with their child, so that a son or daughter feels they can talk honestly about their drug use and how to get help with it.

"This kind of relationship could be at best, damaged, and at worst, destroyed, if a child fears they are going to be drug tested by their own family," he added.

ANI

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