computer program
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Breast Cancer ~ Swine Flu ~ Lung Cancer ~ Heart attack ~ Pregnancy ~ All Health Topics
Home / Health News / 2009 / July 2009 / July 29, 2009
New computer program uses artificial intelligence to diagnose metastatic cancer
RSS / Print / Comments

University of Chicago

Family-based treatment 'better for teens with anorexia'

Cutting back on sleep 'cuts dieting benefits'

Whistling while working makes you do your job better

More on University of Chicago

Breast cancer

Sysmex Announces Establishment of Overseas Subsidiary in Spain to Expand Life Science Business

Breast cancer multigene test may help patients avoid chemo

Mangoes may protect against breast, colon cancer

More on Breast cancer

Health News

Waist size, not BMI can foretell cardiovascular risk in children
A new study by researchers at the University of Georgia, the Menzies Research Institute in Hobart, Australia and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia has found that waist circumference is a better indicator of a childs risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes later in life, as compared to BMI. ANI

Internal body temperature regulates body clock
Fluctuations in internal body temperature regulate the bodys circadian rhythm, the 24-hour cycle that controls metabolism, sleep and other bodily functions, revealed UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers. ANI

Egyptian mummies discovery indicates 'cancer is man-made'
A study of ancient remains has found that cancer is a man-made disease fuelled by pollution and changes to diet and lifestyle. ANI

New computer program uses artificial intelligence to diagnose metastatic cancer

University of Chicago researchers have written a computer program that uses artificial intelligence to diagnose metastatic cancer.


Washington, July 29 : University of Chicago researchers have written a computer program that uses artificial intelligence to diagnose metastatic cancer.

The researchers say that the software analyses the features of ultrasound images to help doctors predict earlier whether a woman's cancer has metastasised, something that can directly affect how her doctors will approach treatment, which may, in turn, influence the outcome of that treatment.

As part of a preliminary pilot study, the researchers reanalysed the diagnostic ultrasounds of 50 women with suspected breast cancer who all had lymph nodes that appeared normal in the ultrasound-suggesting that their cancers had not metastasised.

The team say that all 50 women later underwent surgery to remove their cancers and axillary lymph nodes, and tissue biopsies of the lymph nodes revealed that 20 of them had metastatic cancer and 30 of them had cancer that remained localized at the time of surgery.

According to the researchers, the pilot study aimed to determine whether the computer would have accurately identified the 20 metastatic cases based on analysing the ultrasound images of the tumours.

Medical physicist Karen Drukker, a research associate and assistant professor in the department of radiology at the University of Chicago, said that the program performed promisingly well.

"We discovered that a computer analysis of breast ultrasound could potentially predict with promising accuracy which patients had metastasis and which did not," says Drukker.

The researchers next plan to start an observer study in which several radiologists will use the computer program to see whether it enhances their ability to diagnose metastasis, once again based on retrospective cases for which the answer can later be revealed.

A presentation on the study's findings was made at a meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) in Anaheim, California, on Wednesday.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us