High calcium level
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Breast Cancer ~ Swine Flu ~ Lung Cancer ~ Heart attack ~ Pregnancy ~ All Health Topics
Home / Health News / 2009 / July 2009 / July 29, 2009
High calcium level in arteries signals heart attack risk
RSS / Print / Comments

Heart attack

More strokes, fewer heart attacks with carotid stents: Study

Insulin resistance may be linked to stroke risk

European Medicines Agency approves TWYNSTA® (telmisartan plus amlodipine) a new single pill combination that delivers powerful and consistent blood pressure reductions throughout 24 hours

More on Heart attack

Health News

Blame your mom for your muffin top or thunder thighs
A new study by an international team of researchers, including Cambridge and Oxford experts, has revealed that our propensity to be apple or pear-shaped is at least partly in our genes. ANI

Blame your mom for your muffin top or thunder thighs
A new study by an international team of researchers, including Cambridge and Oxford experts, has revealed that our propensity to be apple or pear-shaped is at least partly in our genes. ANI

Meta-analysis shows folic acid supplements not beneficial for heart
A new meta-analysis has shown that the use of folic acid supplements does not appear to be associated with reduced rates of cardiovascular events, cancer or death over a five-year period. ANI

High calcium level in arteries signals heart attack risk

High calcium level in arteries may signal serious risk of heart attack, according to a new study.


Washington, July 29 : High calcium level in arteries may signal serious risk of heart attack, according to a new study.

The study, published in the online edition of Radiology, claims that scientists may be able to predict future severe cardiac events in patients with known, stable coronary artery disease (CAD), thanks to coronary calcium scoring.

"The amount of calcium in the coronary vessels, as measured by CT, is of high predictive value for subsequent serious or fatal heart attack in these patients, independent of the patient's age, sex and other coronary risk factors," said the study's lead author, Marcus Hacker, M.D., resident physician in the Department of Nuclear Medicine, leader of the research unit for nuclear cardiology and assistant medical director at Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, Germany.

CAD is a condition in which plaque, consisting of cholesterol, calcium, fat and other substances, builds up inside the arteries that supply blood to the heart. When plaque builds up in the coronary arteries, blood flow to the heart is reduced and may lead to arrhythmia, heart attack or heart failure.

Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging is a nuclear medicine diagnostic procedure that provides excellent three-dimensional images of the coronary arteries to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of CAD.

Currently, calcium scoring-measuring the amount of calcium in the arteries-is used as a screening exam and in cases of suspected CAD, but not in cases of known CAD.

Dr. Hacker and colleagues set out to determine if calcium scoring would lend additional prognostic value to SPECT findings in patients with known, stable CAD.

To reach the conclusion, 260 patients with CAD underwent coronary artery calcium scoring in addition to SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging. Over a median period of 5.4 years, the patients were followed up for severe cardiac events, meaning cardiac death or nonfatal heart attacks.

Twenty-three of the 260 patients had a fatal or severe heart attack, and 40 additional patients underwent bypass surgery.

The results showed that patents with an initial calcium score greater than 400 were at significantly increased risk for severe cardiac events.

"We found that coronary calcium seems to play an important role in predicting subsequent heart attack or sudden cardiac death, and adds prognostic value to SPECT findings," said co-author Christopher Uebleis, M.D., member of the research unit for nuclear cardiology at Ludwig Maximilians University.

Dr. Hacker pointed out that combining calcium scoring and SPECT can help to identify patients with known CAD who are at highest risk for serious or fatal heart attacks.

"In these patients, intensified medical therapy, shorter follow-up intervals and, if necessary, bypass procedures may be required to prevent future severe cardiac events," the expert said.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us