Clinical studies establish
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Clinical studies establish strong link between oral infections and cardiovascular disease
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Clinical studies establish strong link between oral infections and cardiovascular disease

Clinical studies conducted recently have established a strong link between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD).


Washington, July 10 : Clinical studies conducted recently have established a strong link between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD).

Marvin J. Slepian and and Neil R. Gottehrer, who will lead a discussion titled 'Oral Body Inflammation Connection' during the 57th Annual Meeting of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) in Baltimore, say that these findings strengthen their belief that oral infections contribute to CVD morbidity and connection of chronic infections and CVD.

The discussion will be one of the first discussions held at the AGD's annual meeting that integrates both dentistry and medicine because the disease is common to both health management groups.

"It is critical for all dentists and physicians to collaborate in helping patients reduce inflammation, which can become a target factor for cardiovascular disease," says Dr. Slepian.

The researchers believe that the information presented during the event will provide dentists with hands-on knowledge regarding how to communicate with physicians in order to collaborate and create more proactive management periodontal disease treatment plans, which can then improve periodontal and associated physical health by reducing CVD.

"This is a landmark course being presented and I am honored to be holding the discussion with my colleague, Dr. Slepian. We hope to provide groundbreaking and useful information to attendees to help them improve the overall health of their patients and to build an increased awareness about the connection between periodontal disease and cardiovascular disease that many, if not most, patients are unaware of," says Dr. Gottehrer.

CVD has a wide range of categories, including high blood pressure, coronary heart disease, stroke, and heart failure. A recent study that will be cited during the presentation explored the existence of bacteria known to cause periodontitis and the growth of blood vessel walls, which is a symptom of CVD.

The researchers say that upon examining the subjects of the study, they found a positive connection between the growth of blood vessel walls and the existence of bacteria found in dental plaque, causing periodontitis.

Dr. Gottehrer stresses the importance of brushing and flossing twice a day to reduce the risk of gum disease and to maintain a happy, healthy mouth. He suggests if abnormal occurrences are noticed, a person should contact a general dentist immediately in order to prevent possible further damage to teeth and gums and to also reduce the risk of CVD.

ANI

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