Scientists develop self
Andhra Pradesh ~ India ~ International ~ City ~ Entertainment ~ Business ~ Sports ~ Technology ~ Health ~ Features
Breast Cancer ~ Swine Flu ~ Lung Cancer ~ Heart attack ~ Pregnancy ~ All Health Topics
Home / Health News / 2008 / December 2008 / December 23, 2008
Scientists develop self-assessment tool to predict chronic kidney disease risk
RSS / Print / Comments

Peripheral Vascular Disease

Dr. Nie Wentao's New Method of Diabetic Nutrition Interventions

Hansen Medical Names New CEO

Volcano Announces Distribution Agreement With AngioScore for the AngioSculpt(R) PTCA Scoring Balloon Catheter in Japan

More on Peripheral Vascular Disease

University of North Carolina

First clinical trial of gene therapy offers muscular dystrophy clues

Genetic patterns that may predict osteoarthritis identified

People with lots of friends live 3.7yrs longer than those who are isolated

More on University of North Carolina

Health News

Waist size, not BMI can foretell cardiovascular risk in children
A new study by researchers at the University of Georgia, the Menzies Research Institute in Hobart, Australia and the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute in Melbourne, Australia has found that waist circumference is a better indicator of a childs risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes later in life, as compared to BMI. ANI

Internal body temperature regulates body clock
Fluctuations in internal body temperature regulate the bodys circadian rhythm, the 24-hour cycle that controls metabolism, sleep and other bodily functions, revealed UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers. ANI

Egyptian mummies discovery indicates 'cancer is man-made'
A study of ancient remains has found that cancer is a man-made disease fuelled by pollution and changes to diet and lifestyle. ANI

Scientists develop self-assessment tool to predict chronic kidney disease risk

Researchers have developed a simple self-assessment tool that can accurately predict those at an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease.


Washington, Dec 23 : Researchers have developed a simple self-assessment tool that can accurately predict those at an increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease.

Scientists from NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have developed a eight-point risk factor checklist that can accurately stratify middle-aged and older patients at high risk for newly diagnosed CKD, which involves a gradual, even fatal loss of kidney function over time.

The eight key risk factors are older age, anaemia, female sex, hypertension, diabetes, Peripheral Vascular Disease, and any history of congestive heart failure or cardiovascular disease,

"Each of the eight components that make up the score is also easy to identify or quickly assess during any doctor-patient interview," said Dr. Abhijit V. Kshirsagar of the University of North Carolina Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, and the study's lead author.

"Patients themselves can even self-assess using the tool, and bring their concerns to their doctor, if need be," he added.

"These patients are often battling concurrent conditions such as diabetes or heart disease, so anything we can do to predict and then lower their risk for kidney disease will be invaluable," said study senior author Dr. Phyllis A. August, the Ralph A. Baer Professor of Medical Research at Weill Cornell Medical College, and an internist and nephrologist at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Centre.

During the study, the researchers combined data from two major studies, which included a total 14,155 men and women aged 45 years or older.

All of the participants had a glomerular filtration rate exceeding 60 mL/min/1.73m2 at the beginning of the study - indicating their kidneys were functioning at a normal healthy level at that time.

The researchers then tracked the health of the participants during a follow-up of up to nine years, recording those participants whose filtration rate fell below the healthy 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 threshold.

They also tracked a wide variety of risk factors thought important to the onset of CKD.

Overall, a total of 1,605 participants from the two cohorts went on to develop CKD over the course of follow-up.

"We discovered that a scoring system that included eight key risk factors - older age, anaemia, female sex, hypertension, diabetes, Peripheral Vascular Disease and any history of congestive heart failure or cardiovascular disease - accurately predicted which of the older patients would proceed to CKD and which would not," said study co-author Dr. Heejung Bang, assistant professor in the Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology in the Department of Public Health at Weill Cornell Medical College.

Older age, at or over 70, was of highest predictive significance. Scoring a total of just three points in the model captured 70 percent of those patients who would go on to develop CKD over the next 10 years.

ANI

Link to this page

Suggested pages for your additional reading
AndhraNews.net on Facebook






© 2000-2017 AndhraNews.net. All Rights Reserved and are of their respective owners.
Disclaimer, Terms of Service & Privacy Policy | Contact Us