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Seventh Generation Donates 2.5 Million Diapers to Families in Need


October 1, 2015 - Burlington, VT

With Diaper Need Awareness Week (Sept. 28 - Oct. 4) underway, Seventh Generation, a leading household and personal care company, today celebrated the culmination of its successful diaper promotion with Whole Foods Market and Baby Buggy®. For every pack of Seventh Generation Free & Clear diapers purchased at Whole Foods Market between May 1 - September 30, 2015, Seventh Generation donated a pack of its newborn or size one diapers to Baby Buggy, a national nonprofit that provides families with children in need across the country with essential gear, clothing, products and services. Over the past five months, a total of 2.5 million diapers have been dispersed nationwide to families in need through Baby Buggy and Good360.

"We believe all babies deserve access to safe and healthy products, and through the partnership of two organizations that share this same approach, we were able to make a positive impact on the lives of families across the country," said John Replogle, CEO of Seventh Generation. "When you buy Seventh Generation, you're buying more than just a diaper. You're helping advance the mission of caring today for seven generations of tomorrow."

Nationwide, the need for diapers is great with nearly one in three U.S. families not able to afford an adequate supply. Over the course of the Change for Good promotion, Baby Buggy distributed 1.5 million Seventh Generation Free & Clear diapers through its national partner network in California, Colorado, D.C., Georgia, Florida, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Texas, and Washington. The diaper donations have helped families in countless ways, from a father in Southern California who can now send his child to daycare with real diapers instead of the makeshift homemade diapers he once created, to the expecting, low-income military families in the Seattle area who welcomed diapers in advance of their babies' arrival. The donations provide a necessity for babies and peace of mind for parents, as illustrated by the young mom living in a group home in New York who can now focus on reading to and playing with her baby when she gets home from her job as a store clerk, instead of worrying about how she will squeeze enough out of her paycheck to buy the diapers she needs. She can now be the type of mom she wants to be and that she never had.

"Diapers are an essential and relentless need. There are very few state or federal child safety-net programs that allocate dollars specifically for the purchase of diapers, and yet a pack costs approximately 1.5 hours working minimum wage for low-income families to afford," said Dr. Laurel Parker West, Vice President National Programs, Baby Buggy. "This program is especially critical to families we serve who often have to choose between buying food and buying diapers, and we are so pleased to be making this national distribution to families in need."

Seventh Generation Free & Clear unbleached diapers are designed to provide premium absorbency and leak protection, without unnecessary, harsh chemicals. The diapers are made without fragrances, petroleum-based lotions or chlorine processing, offering a mindful choice for parents. For more information about Seventh Generation, please visit www.seventhgeneration.com. To continue to be part of the diaper need conversation, follow #BuyGive.

About Seventh Generation
Established in 1988, in Burlington, Vermont, Seventh Generation is one of the nation's leading brands of household and personal care products. The company lives its commitment to "caring today for seven generations of tomorrows," with products formulated to provide mindful solutions for the air, surfaces, fabrics, pets and people within your home -- and for the community and environment outside of it. A pioneer in corporate responsibility, Seventh Generation continually evaluates ways to reduce its environmental impact, increase performance and safety, and create a more sustainable supply chain. To learn more about Seventh Generation products and business practices, locate a retailer in your area, or review Seventh Generation's Corporate Consciousness Report, visit www.seventhgeneration.com.

About Whole Foods Market®
Founded in 1980 in Austin, Texas, Whole Foods Market (wholefoodsmarket.com), is the leading natural and organic food retailer. As America's first national certified organic grocer, Whole Foods Market was named "America's Healthiest Grocery Store" by Health magazine. The company's motto, "Whole Foods, Whole People, Whole Planet"™ captures its mission to ensure customer satisfaction and health, Team Member excellence and happiness, enhanced shareholder value, community support and environmental improvement. Thanks to the company's more than 88,000 team members, Whole Foods Market has been ranked as one of the "100 Best Companies to Work For" in America by FORTUNE magazine for 18 consecutive years. In fiscal year 2014, the company had sales of more than $14 billion and currently has more than 417 stores in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom. For more company news and information, please visit media.wfm.com.

About Baby Buggy
Founded by Jessica Seinfeld in 2001, Baby Buggy takes an innovative, child-focused approach to curbing generational poverty. By tying access to critical child gear items to parental enrollment in anti-poverty programs, Baby Buggy provides for the safety and health of a child while parents get the long-term support they need to help lift the family out of poverty. To date, Baby Buggy has provided over 16 million items to more than 139 anti-poverty program sites in 17 markets. Baby Buggy has been rated a 4-Star Charity by Charity Navigator and has received national accreditation from the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance. In 2014, 90 cents of every dollar donated to Baby Buggy went to programs. For more information, visit www.babybuggy.org.

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