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NorthShore University HealthSystem Becomes First in Illinois to Install Revolutionary Neurological Operating System


July 14, 2015 - Evanston, IL

EVANSTON, IL--(Marketwired - July 14, 2015) - NorthShore University HealthSystem (NorthShore) based in Evanston, Ill., has become the first in the state and only a handful in the country to utilize Synaptive Servo -- a new surgical operating system that mounts a powerful optics platform onto an automated positioning system for use with BrightMatter Guide. BrightMatter technologies -- Drive, Vision and Guide -- are designed to work in concert to allow a surgeon far greater flexibility in both the navigation and execution of a complex surgery. The operating system is used for removal of brain tumors and blood clots deep in the brain.

Specifically, the BrightMatter Servo solution allows a surgeon to:

  • Automatically track surgical tools with Drive, using a robotic arm to keep optics and light externally aimed where they are most needed;
  • Replace cumbersome optics with Vision for a collaborative and accessible surgical field with great resolution and a high depth of field;
  • Evaluate a surgical plan in the operating room with Guide, 3D imaging and other advanced visualizations that are available for navigation using a surgical trajectory.

The system works in conjunction with the NICO 6 pillar approach -- a minimally invasive brain surgical technique that provides new hope to brain cancer patients with tumors that used to be considered inoperable. This is a safe, effective surgical solution for removing tumors, blood clots and other growths located deep within the brain -- all through an opening smaller than a dime. It is uniquely designed to minimize the risk of damage to areas of the brain that control speech, movement, memory, vision and other functions. It may also reduce length of hospital stay.

This advanced technology integrates the following 6 pillars: brain mapping, navigation technology, access, high definition optics, tissue removal and targeted therapy.

Before surgery, the neurosurgeon studies the brain's fiber tracts to plan the safest route to access the growth. High definition optics and a GPS-like navigation system guide the BrainPath technology helping surgeons move through the natural folds of the brain to safely remove hard to reach tumors and blood clots.

"This is a substantial shift in the operating paradigm. The software allows us to conduct surgical planning like never before," said Julian Bailes, MD, co-chair of NorthShore's Neurological Institute. "In addition, the robotically positioned scope saves time for both the patient and the neurosurgeon. It's less invasive and lessens recovery time."

In a typical brain surgery the neurosurgeon needs to reposition a microscope up to 50 times or more in each operation. With the new Synaptive system the visual system can be repositioned with the push of a foot pedal easily accessed from where the neurosurgeon is seated.

The system works thanks to a 3D navigation system that knows the exact location and orientation of the tools being used. It overlays the location of the tools over the 3D visualizations of the brain and uses the BrightMatter Plan system to develop a path for the instruments to take.

About NorthShore University HealthSystem

Headquartered in Evanston, Illinois, NorthShore University HealthSystem (NorthShore) is a comprehensive, fully integrated, healthcare delivery system that serves the Chicago region. The system includes four hospitals in Evanston, Glenview, Highland Park and Skokie. NorthShore employs approximately 10,000 staff and has 2,400 affiliated physicians, including a 900 physician, multispecialty group practice with 100 office locations. Further, NorthShore supports teaching and research as the principal teaching affiliate for the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine.

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Contact information
Colette Urban
Director, Public Relations
847.570.3144

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